Vitra Lights

Vitra lighting designs have been used in numerous high-profile settings including the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Tate Modern in London and Deutsche Bank headquarters in Frankfurt.

Vitra manufacturers the work of many famous designers, notably Charles and Ray Eames, Jasper Morrison, George Nelson, Antonio Citterio and Isamu Noguchi.

In 1951 Japanese-American Isamu Noguchi started designing the Akari light sculptures. He chose the name ‘akari’ as it is a word that means ‘light’ in Japanese  - both physical lightness and illumination.

On a visit to Japan, Noguchi visited a town called Gifu which is known for its paper parasols. The visit inspired him to sketch his first two Akari light sculptures and he eventually designed more than 100 models - from ceiling to table and floor lamps -in a variety of sizes.

Noguchi wanted his lighting designs to serve both practical and social functions and this is apparent in the Vitra lighting range of paper lanterns. The different shapes and styles allow for different amounts of light to be emitted, creating various atmospheres in your home or office.

Akari lights look as striking switched off as they do switched on. These lanterns really are artwork in their own right. The Vitra Akari E light sculpture hangs like beads on a necklace, while the sphere of Vitra Akari 120A light sculpture has a moon-like shape, providing a more peaceful, relaxed ambience.

The range of Vitra Akari floor lights are just as mesmerising, with the Vitra Akari UF3-Q light sculpture featuring striking black dots, alongside the futuristic Vitra Akari 1AY light sculpture and Vitra Akari BB3-33S light sculpture which look like they could have been designed today, but were actually designed in 1951.

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