Cappellini Chairs

Capellini is a furniture design company which was founded in 1946 in Arosio, Italy by Enrico Cappellini. The company has always been intuitive when it comes to discovering new design talent, providing that first springboard to many famous design names today. The list of their designers is impressive - reading like a who’s who of the design world.

The chair is often used by designers to showcase different styles and innovations and  as a result there are many iconic Cappellini chairs.

The Cappellini S-chair by Tom Dixon is a classic Cappellini piece with a curvaceous seat. This Cappellini chair is made from metal with a fixed seat which can be made from a selection of fabrics, leather, straw or wicker.

The comfortable and stylish Cappellini Low Pad chair by Jasper Morrison is part of the collection designed for the opening of the Tate Modern in London.

The Cappellini Thinking Man's chair by Jasper Morrison is one of his earliest designs. This Cappellini chair is so useful - suitable for indoor and outdoor use and with armrests that have been fitted with drinks trays.

The Cappellini Knotted chair is a unique piece for Cappellini. Designed by Marcel Wanders, it has been constructed using a knotted cord which is coated in resin to hold its shape.

Designed in 1988, the stunning Cappellini Embryo chair defined Marc Newson’s signature style. The process of making this Cappellini chair was technologically advanced, using molded polyurethane foam over an internal steel frame. This stunning piece adds style to any contemporary interior.

The Cappellini Proust and Proust Geometrica by Alessandro Cappellini is recognised as an icon of the twentieth century design. The Cappellini chair was designed in 1978 for the Palazzo dei Diamanti in Ferrara. The striking Proust Geometrica fabric displays a glorious multi-coloured pattern which will be a breath-taking statement feature in any room.

 

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